APS News

Sexual Harassment Drives Women out of Physics

A survey of undergraduate women in physics indicates that nearly three-quarters experienced harassment that left them feeling alienated and alone

April 22, 2019

A comprehensive survey of undergraduate women in physics has revealed that almost three-quarters of the respondents experienced some form of sexual harassment over the past two years that resulted in feelings of isolation and alienation. The results, published in the APS journal Physical Review Physics Education Research (PRPER), are based on responses from 471 women who attended the 2017 APS Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics (CUWiP). The paper is accompanied by a Viewpoint commentary in Physics (physics.aps.org).

“I wanted to quantify the scope of sexual harassment in physics to enable productive discussions that extend beyond personal anecdotes,” explains Lauren Aycock (an American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow at the U.S. Department of Energy), first author of the paper in PRPER. “This study increases the visibility of the problem without relying on women who have experienced sexual harassment to tell their stories.“

The study also found that gender harassment, one type of sexual harassment, is correlated with a diminished sense of belonging and the imposter phenomenon (a persistent, unjustified feeling of being someone who is undeserving of their accomplishments). These patterns, according to earlier research, negatively influence students’ persistence in STEM fields.

Sexual Harassment Drives Women out of Physics
Image: Joan Tycko

In addition to Lauren Aycock, the study's authors are Zahra Hazari (Florida International University), Eric Brewe (Drexel University), Kathryn Clancy (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Theodore Hodapp (Director of Project Development and Senior Adviser to Education and Diversity, APS), and Renee Michelle Goertzen (Senior Program Manager, Education and Diversity, APS).

"This finding won’t surprise most women in STEMM [science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine], but it may shock their male colleagues, who are often unaware of sexual harassment’s pervasiveness and damage," wrote Viewpoint author Julie Libarkin (Michigan State University).  "When sexual harassment goes unchecked, physics loses great people, great minds, and great potential."

References

Aycock, L.M., Hazari, Z., Brewe, E., Clancy, K.B.H., Hodapp, T., Goertzen, R.M., "Sexual Harassment Reported by Undergraduate Female Physicists," Phys. Rev. Phys. Ed. Res. 15, 010121 (2019).

Libarkin, J., "Yes, Sexual Harassment Still Drives Women Out of Physics," Physics 12, 43 (2019).

News Update Archive

View Archive


APS News

Read Current Issue


Recent News Update
Productive Scientific Discourse Demands Respect
APS strives to provide a welcoming and inclusive environment for all those engaged in physics.
APS Continues Progress to Make US More Welcoming for Science
The China Initiative, which sowed fear among some APS members and curtailed legitimate collaborations, has ended in its current form.
March Meeting Heads to Chicago
The 2022 APS March Meeting will be held live in Chicago with many sessions available online as well.
Celebrating Leaders in Physics Teacher Preparation
Nine colleges and universities received top honors for preparing highly qualified high school physics teachers.
2022 APS Medal for Exceptional Achievement in Research Awarded to Elliott Lieb
Princeton University physicist to receive top APS honor
Preview: 39th Annual Gallery of Fluid Motion
This week, researchers studying the physics of fluids will meet in Phoenix for the 74th Annual Meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics (DFD).